Rescripted Announces ‘The Key: Youth Critics Mentorship Program’

CHICAGO (September 8, 2017) – Greenhouse Theater Center’s Artistic Director Jacob Harvey is pleased to announce The Key: Young Critics Mentorship Program, a training program for Chicago youth in arts criticism created by national online arts platform Rescripted, The Chicago Inclusion Project and entertainment critic Oliver Sava and hosted by the Greenhouse. Launching this fall, the ten-week initiative for youth ages 16 – 20 will include arts criticism workshops and lectures with the program’s creators, as well as guest speakers from all facets of the Chicago theater community. Students will attend Chicago theater productions throughout the fall season, write original critiques, undergo one-on-one editing sessions and create personal blogs to host their writing portfolio and multimedia reviews. Select critiques will also be published on Rescripted.

Applications for The Key: Young Critics Mentorship Program are currently being accepted at rescripted.org through Friday, September 22, 2017. For additional information and inquiries, please e-mail thekey.chicago@gmail.com.

“Our industry depends on having actively engaged critics who can perceive and appreciate the efforts and viewpoint of the artist,” comments Rescripted Editor-In-Chief Regina Victor. “I’m thrilled to partner with a savvy writer like Oliver Sava to co-facilitate this course in partnership with Chicago Inclusion Project, and grateful to Greenhouse Theater Center for hosting us. We are looking forward to mentoring the next generation of theater artists and writers as they learn to navigate the field of arts criticism. We want to be a part of the movement to ensure there are a multitude of critical perspectives to accommodate the increasing diversity of the stories on our stages.”

“We’ve put together a program that will give young critics the knowledge they need to start their careers, adds Oliver Sava. “This isn’t just about learning how to write reviews – it’s about helping young critics engage with what they’re watching on a deeper level, turn that engagement into pieces that will grab readers and learn how to sell that writing so they can ideally get paid for their work. This program is primarily focused on theater, but it will be multi-disciplinary because knowing how to write about a wide range of media is essential in the current arts journalism field. There are voices that could significantly enrich critical discourse in the city, and organizations like Chicago Inclusion Project and outlets like Rescripted are already working to make these voices heard.”

Chicago Inclusion Project Founder Emjoy Gavino comments, “The conversation around arts criticism, its practitioners and their ethical obligation to inclusion is truly exciting right now. As always our organization seeks to accompany talk with action we are thrilled to usher in the new wave of critics. Our community and industry deserve new voices.”

The Key: Young Critics Mentorship Program joins the Greenhouse Theater Center’s increasing number of initiatives aimed at growing Chicago theater, including the The Trellis Residency Initiative, a new professional development program for Chicago-area playwrights under 30, and the MC-10 Playwrights Ensemble, a collection of ten of the country’s most sought-after established and mid-career Chicago playwrights and theater-makers now in residence at the Greenhouse.

 

About the Program Creators/Mentors

Regina Victor is a producer, dramaturg, director and performer from Oakland California. They attended Phillips Exeter and Santa Clara University, from which they hold a B.A. in Theatre Arts and Religious Studies. Regina has worked with theatres such as Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Marin Theatre Company, Chicago Dramatists, The Hypocrites, Shattered Globe, Walkabout Theatre, and more. Victor’s writing has been published on Rescripted, Howlround and The Bold Italic. They are currently serving as the 17/18 Artistic Apprentice and Multicultural Fellow at Steppenwolf Theatre, as well as a member of the 17/18 Stage Directors and Choreographers’ Observership Class.

Oliver Sava is a Chicago-based entertainment writer focusing on comic books, television, and theater. He was a staff Theater Writer at Time Out Chicago, where he had a Performer Of The Week interview column. His writing on comic books, film, podcasts, television, and theater has been published at The A.V. Club, Chicago Theater Beat, Chicago Tribune, The L.A. Times, NPR Books, New York Magazine’s Vulture, VICE, and Vox. He is a 2017 fellow of The Eugene O’Neill Center’s National Critics Institute and a recipient of the 2017 Eisner Award for “Best Comics-Related Journalism/Periodical” for his A.V. Club writing. He graduated from Loyola University with degrees in English and Political Science, and was the dramaturg for Jackalope Theatre’s Prowess (2017 Jeff Award winner for Best New Play).

Rescripted is a collective of theatre professionals from all levels and disciplines in the field who are interested in engaging with their peers on a critical level. Founded by Regina Victor and Katherine O’Keefe, Rescripted is a national response to the need for a broader range of voices in the critical sphere. With writers in Los Angeles, Chicago, and the San Francisco Bay Area, Rescripted is shaped by its contributors’ interests, and specializes in publishing reviews, artist interviews, and essays on topics pertinent to our field. With a supportive framework in mind, Rescripted aims to reprogram the way we critically engage with each other while cultivating critics and adding new voices to the field. www.rescripted.org.

Founded by Actor/Casting Director Emjoy Gavino, The Chicago Inclusion Project is a collective of artists, committed to creating inclusive theater experiences by bringing together Chicago artists and audiences normally separated by ethnic background, economic status, gender identity, physical ability and countless other barriers. By deliberately choosing the unexpected, both in play choices and non-traditional casting, cultivating a diverse audience by bringing new combinations of artists to as many communities in Chicago (and it surrounding suburbs) as possible, choosing facilities for the multiple projects that are handicap accessible and keeping price of tickets affordable, The Chicago Inclusion Project programming aims to unite diverse collections of Chicagoans. For more information, visit www.thechicagoinclusionproject.org

About the Greenhouse Theater Center
The Greenhouse Theater Center is a producing theater company, performance venue and theatre bookstore located at 2257 N. Lincoln Ave. in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. Our mission is first and foremost to grow local theatre.
The Greenhouse Theater began its producing life in 2014 with the smash hit Churchill, after which came 2016’s much-lauded Solo Celebration!, an 8 month, 16 event series highlighting the breadth and depth of the solo play form. This year, the Greenhouse announced a full subscription season, with a mix of multi-character and solo plays. With a focus on our community, the Greenhouse is also launching the Trellis playwriting residency, an initiative designed to cultivate the next generation of Chicago theatre creators and a two-tiered education program for college and high school students.

As a performance venue, our complex offers two newly remodeled 190-seat main stage spaces, two 60-seat studio theaters, two high-capacity lobbies, and an in-house rehearsal room. We strive to cultivate a fertile environment for local artists, from individual renters to our bevy of resident companies, and to develop and produce their work. In 2016, the Greenhouse announced a new residency program, which offers a reduced rate to local storefront companies while giving the Greenhouse a stake in the resident’s success. We house Chicago’s only dedicated used theatre bookstore, located on the second floor of our complex.

With new ideas always incubating, the Greenhouse is flourishing. Come grow with us!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRESS CONTACT: David Rosenberg
David Rosenberg Public Relations
david@drpublicrelations.com / (773) 505-1429

 

‘We’re Gonna Die’ at Haven Theatre Electrifies Audiences

(Photo Credit: Austin D. Oie)

By Regina Victor

Before I embark on writing the review for We’re Gonna Die, written by Young Jean Lee and directed by Josh Sobel for Haven Theatre company, I have to explain the circumstances under which I am seeing and writing about this show. I am writing this review on the way home from my grandfather’s funeral. A few hours before opening curtain for We’re Gonna Die on May 7th, 2017, my grandfather died. I wasn’t sure I was going to make it to the show that evening.

I am so glad I got there.

When you first walk into the Den and take a left into the Bookspan Theatre occupied by Haven and named after Artistic Director Josh Sobel’s aunt, Janet Bookspan, you are greeted with the sweet scent of a smoky haze machine. The entry to the space is plastered with pop and punk posters, and as I left the antique stylings of the Den lobby I felt like I’d walked into an independent rock show. The audience has the option of sitting at low, cabaret-style tables and being right up on the action (as I chose to do), or sitting in the more traditional bleacher-style seating. No matter where you sit, you can see the faces of everyone watching the show with you, which seems like an intentional effort to support the intimacy of this play.

We’re Gonna Die is an ode to living and dying, guided by the Singer, Isa Arciniegas, whose alto voice is versatile enough to go from sweet ballad to angsty rock song. Isa captured the crowd with her stamina and ability within the first ten minutes, as she effortlessly got the audience on board for the cabaret-style of the show. She never lost confidence or momentum and moved deftly through the witty and emotional text, trusting that the audience was smart enough to keep up with her. It’s a crucial first ten minutes in a compact play, running under an hour and a half with no intermission.

The design world of We’re Gonna Die fused effortlessly with the text. The simple stage (set design by Mike Mroch) ) and punky costumes (Izuma Inaba) were effective, I couldn’t help but think of Rosie The Riveter when looking at the red bandanna and brunette ponytail on “lady-drummer Sarah [Giovanetti]” as Isa affectionately called her during the opening performance. The play’s title We’re Gonna Die is cleverly turned into a band logo (WGD) that is stitched into Isa’s jacket and displayed in neon lights behind them.  But the most notable aspect of the design was the lighting crafted by Claire Chrzan, who hung a multitude of household lamps  above our heads mixed in amongst stage lights, making  the lights themselves just as intriguing to look at as the stage they were lighting. The play consists of various stories from people’s lives, and I couldn’t help wondering if these lamps had sat in their living rooms and now lived again as homage to them and part of this show. I could have spent the show watching the lamps dim in and out, but the ensemble is too ferociously entertaining to allow it.

As a performer and musician myself, I know one of the hardest things in the world is to act and be in a band at the same time. In such intimate proximity to the audience, I was probably five feet away from the nearest musician, all the band members are closely watched and can’t fudge any notes or lose their cool. I have never been so impressed. Elle Walker’s poise while playing the keys and confident tosses of her long brunette hair during an exuberant and carefree dance solo ensure she grabs the spotlight at choice moments in the show. Jordan Harris possesses a beautiful singing voice, their solo moment is only one line but I was struck by the melodic tendencies of their voice. Last but certainly not least is Spencer Meeks’ beautifully messy eyeliner, and funky scene-stealing guitar solos. On the night I saw it, they also had a standout improvised moment about how their Green Goddess veggie drink was not the best choice for hydrating during a rock concert. I can happily report that hydrated or not, Spencer’s vocal talent as they harmonized on various songs was still excellent . Every person in the ensemble not only had great stand-out moments, they were serving every second of the show!

The twists and turns of Young Jean Lee’s emotional journey are best left unsaid so that you can be as delighted and devastated by them as I was. The show is compiled of true stories collected through interviews, and through their specificity they give the audience a place in each anecdote. One sentiment that I feel was perfectly captured here was the (dare I say the word?) millennial sense of being special, and deserving of immunity from tragedy, while also being perfectly aware of one’s imminent mortality. It is a reality in this new world that each of us is more empowered than we’ve ever been and simultaneously just as helpless to our mortality as ever.

Despite this feeling of millennial immortality, as the play says if you are a person there will be a day when you die. When your time comes, that is your time. Instead of being a depressing realization I found it galvanizing. My grandfather has 12 grandchildren while being an aeroengineer as a black man in the 1950’s and 1960’s. As sure as we are of death, we can also be sure that our full lives will affect those we leave behind, and that our stories will be told. I came to this show with the rawest open heart, and I left with a sense of how important life is, and how important it is to record the history of those lives and immortalize ourselves through art.

I thoroughly enjoyed my experience at We’re Gonna Die, and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in a fun punk show about living and dying. The remarkable direction of Josh Sobel, artistic director of Haven Theatre, moves easily from deep tragedy to big joy (remember – I said dance sequence!!). Lucky for you, it’s been extended to June 10th, so be sure to get your tickets ASAP if you’re interested in this fun rock production!

http://haventheatrechicago.com/were-gonna-die/

Isa Arciniegas – SINGER

Spencer Meeks – GUITAR / BASS

Sarah Giovannetti – DRUMS

Jordan Harris – KEYBOARD

Elle Walker – KEYBOARD

Kamille Dawkins – SINGER u/s

 

PRODUCTION

Playwright – Young Jean Lee

Director – Josh Sobel

Music Director – Spencer Meeks

Scenic Design – Mike Mroch

Costume Design – Claire Chrzan

Sound Engineer – Archer Curry

Choreography – Jon Martinez

Production Management – Krista Mickelson

Stage Management – Julia Leghorn

Assistant Director – Abhi Shrestha

Assistant Production Manager – Corbin Paulino

Master Electrician – Cedar Larson

Technical Direction – Alan Weusthoff

Graphic Design – Jenifer Dorman

 

Production photos by Austin D. Oie