Goodman Theatre’s ‘Sweat’ Lays Bare the Passions of Working America

Sweat, written by Lynn Nottage, is a Pulitzer prize winner that focuses on race, debt in America, capitalism, and the working class. Director Ron OJ Parson’s production of Sweat at the Goodman is, at its core, about humanity, power, and the fight for survival. It’s about what will humanity do when they are pushed to the breaking point and worked like a dog. Sadly, the answer is not as black and white as it seems as Brucie states “you think they give a damn about you?”   Continue reading “Goodman Theatre’s ‘Sweat’ Lays Bare the Passions of Working America”

Heritage, History, and Comedy in ‘Remember The Alamo’

Remember the Alamo is a world premiere Neo-Lab original being performed at The Neo-Futurist Theatre. The show is created by Neo-Futurist ensemble member: Nick Hart and directed by Neo-Futurist Artistic director Kurt Chiang. This production promises its audience that they will help the actors fully recreate the Alamo battle. This show contains more than that, it also has themes of death, interesting facts about Phil Collins, and a narrative of what it’s like to be mixed-race in America through individual personal narratives. Continue reading “Heritage, History, and Comedy in ‘Remember The Alamo’”

Everyone Is Not Who They Seem in ‘On Clover Road’

On Clover Road is a Chicago premiere play written by Steven Dietz, performed at American Blues Theater and directed by Halena Kays. On Clover Road demands the audience to consider how far they would go to save those they love, and those terrible moments when you discover someone is not who they said they were. Dietz’s play show centers a woman who believes she will be reunited with her daughter, but she has become a member of a dangerous cult. The following twist and turns will leave you on the edge of your seat. Continue reading “Everyone Is Not Who They Seem in ‘On Clover Road’”

‘Evil Dead: The Musical’ is a Whirlwind of Camp and Horror

Evil Dead: The Musical written by George Reinblatt produced by Black Button Eyes at the Pride Arts center feels unlike many theatrical experiences I’ve had before. It’s directed by Black Button Eyes production’s leading director Ed Rutherford, who knows how to stage the supernatural. The patrons coming in were all buzzing full of energy, excited to be sitting in the splatter zone. Some were wearing safety glasses to protect themselves from fake blood while others had on all white, prepared to embrace the messiness of the show, as rock music blared through the speakers. Continue reading “‘Evil Dead: The Musical’ is a Whirlwind of Camp and Horror”